Orion Parsec 8300C Astronomical Imaging Camera

8.3 million pixels of resolution produces Astro-images that will make your DSLR camera want to hide

Astronomy Products

Give the Orion Parsec 8300C, a try, and see if you still look at your DSLR camera

Astronomy Products – The Orion Parsec 8300C is the latest CCD time-machine-to-the-stars capable of taking one-shot, full-frame, 8.3-megapixel color views during your “Journey to the Beginning of Space and Time” in perfect resolution. The Orion Parsec 8300C Astronomical Imaging Camera is designed and engineered around Kodak’s 8.3-megapixel KAF-8300 sensor and is one of the most advanced CCD time-machines-to-the-stars you can purchase to “Journey to the Beginning of Space and Time.

Amazing color images of the universe

The Orion Parsec 8300C Astronomical Imaging Camera’s color Kodak CCD chip is built around the 5.4 micron x 5.4-micron pixel size for superior resolution and uses Kodak’s microlens technology for maximum sensitivity. Regulated dual-stage thermoelectric cooling and the adjustable fan included with the Orion Parsec 8300C Astronomical Imaging Camera reduces the thermal noise you’ll experience while the internal full-frame memory buffer allows you to reliably and efficiently download your images for later use.

Top quality at a reasonable price

You get all of this Astro imaging power at a relatively low price, considering the quality of the views this outstanding CCD camera produces, and the Parsec 8300C Astronomical Imaging Camera is compatible with Windows XP and later operating systems. You just plug the Parsec 8300C Astronomical Imaging Camera into the USB 2.0 port on your computer with the included cable and power your time-machine-to-the-stars using the 12-volt DC power cable included that plugs into a car accessory jack, or other compatible power sources.

Read this PDF on the Orion Parsec 8300 Series Astronomical Imaging Camera.

Do you love astronomy? Check out my latest astronomy website at http://astronomytonight.yolasite.com/.

Read about NASA’s Messenger spacecraft and its mission to Mercury

Have you heard about the recent meteorite that exploded near the Ural Mountains

Read about the supernova astronomers are studying looking for a black hole they think was created during the explosion

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Meade LS-6 go-to Telescope

One of the best time-machine-to-the-stars you can buy

Astronomy Products

Flip the switch on your Meade LS-6 and being your “Journey to the Beginning of Space and Time”

Astronomy Products – Just set up your time-machine-to-the-stars, flick the ignition switch, and your “Journey to the Beginning of Space and Time” begins. Incorporating GPS satellites, internal leveling sensors, a magnetic north compass, and a built-in ECLIPS CCD imager capable of displaying vibrant astroimages on the scope or filing them away so you can send them to all of your astronomy buddies, later, the Meade LS-6 ACF Telescope includes the industry’s most advanced go-to astronomy system, for truly hands-free star-gazing.

Flick the switch, connect to GPS

The Light Switch Technology included with the Meade LS-6 go-to telescope goes to work with the flick of the switch, turning over the job of connecting the global positioning system with overhead satellites to a built-in Integrated Sensor Module (ISM). The global positioning system pinpoints the exact location and local time of your time-machine-to-the-stars on the planet’s surface and then the Level North Technology sensors silently search for two alignment stars and automatically start charting out a real-time sky map of the night sky in its memory banks for the present time and your location on the Earth’s surface.

The perfect telescope for the educated amateur astronomer heading out into the universe for their first “Journey to the Beginning of Space and Time”. The Meade LS-6 will automatically take you to points in space and time you’ll never forget and you can take a few pictures of your unforgettable views to show your friends, when you get back.

Perfect telescope for both amateur and professional astronomers

Experienced astronomers will love not having to remember the name of alignment stars or having to worry about the view being blocked by a tree or house, which can be frustrating and time-consuming to solve. The Meade LS-6 go-to telescope solves these problems and gives you more time for what you really want to do, “Journey to the Beginning of Space and Time”.

http://astronomytonight.yolasite.com/ is my latest project. Check it out and let me know what you think?

Read about NASA’s Messenger spacecraft and its mission to Mercury

Have you heard about the recent meteorite that exploded near the Ural Mountains

Read about the supernova astronomers are studying looking for a black hole they think was created during the explosion

Kendrick Astro Instruments Stargate Observer Tent

Every astronomers’ observatory is waiting

Astronomy Products

A lightweight and portable observatory you can set up anywhere

Astronomy Products – Kendrick Astro Instruments has been in the business of selling some of the top observer tents in the world for years. Stargazers love the ease of use and set up of Kendrick observer tents, but nothing is perfect, and Kendrick has been listening to its customers. Measuring 10 feet wide by 15 feet long and 6.5 feet high at the center, Kendrick Astro Instruments Stargate Observer Tent is the latest edition to Kendrick’s line of observer tents introduced a decade ago. Still including everything you loved about Kendrick’s original Observatory Tent, the new Kendrick Astro Instruments Stargate Observer Tent has been redesigned to include two separate rooms, one for you to continue your “Journey to the Beginning of Space and Time, and another for sleeping away the hours, separated by a polyester wall.
Dimensions1
The Kendrick Stargate II Observer tent dimensions.
Dimensions2 

Great for the amateur or professional astronomer

You set up your time-machine-to-the-stars in the 10 foot x 9 foot star-gazing room, and then you and your weary-eyed stargazing companion sleep away the hours of the day in the smaller 10 foot x 6-foot sleeping area. Once the sun goes down and the stars appear in the night sky, you simply head into your observatory and unzip the 6-foot-wide observing flap, and continue your “Journey to the Beginning of Space and Time” in perfect comfort. Once you return from your adventure, simply close the observing flap, cover your telescope, and move into the next room for some well-deserved rest.
 
Grab Kendrick Astro Instrument’s Stargate Observer Tent and let your journey to the beginning of space and time continue
Check out my latest astronomy website at http://astronomytonight.yolasite.com/. 
 

Explore the Celestial Zoo of Pulsars

The Crab Nebula is the remains of a star that went supernova
The Crab Nebula was one of the first pulsars viewed during the human “Journey to the Beginning of Space and Time”

Browse the Celestial Zoo

Astronomy News – Browsing through a popular and well-read book on astronomy from the 1980s, one might get the idea astronomers have pierced the veil of secrecy surrounding stellar bodies we refer to as neutron stars. Astronomers and stargazers have boarded their time-machine-to-the-stars to journey to exotic parts of space and time to view these strange celestial bodies for decades. Astronomers have been studying the central body of the Crab Nebula for hundreds of years, watching as it emits regular apparent emissions in the direction of Earth about 30 times per second as it rotates, in what astronomers have described as a lighthouse effect.
 
The description of neutron stars in astronomy books from the 1980s isn’t necessarily incorrect, but research in the intervening years has led scientists to believe astronomy books need to be rewritten in parts and filled in a bit more. Astronomers now believe that neutron stars aren’t all born crab-like and that this scenario is only one of a menagerie of weird and unusual celestial objects they refer to as neutron stars. A menagerie of bizarre stellar bodies representing a significant percentage of the total population of neutron stars they have viewed during the human “Journey to the Beginning of Space and Time.”
 

Astronomers have found weird and wonderful things that astound and amaze

The menagerie of stellar bodies astronomers are bringing into the pulsar zoo are weird characters, with names like magnetars, anomalous x-ray pulsars, rotating radio transients, compact central objects, and soft gamma repeaters, and properties, unlike the famous Crab Nebula. All of these characters constitute at least ten percent of the total population of neutron stars observed and they could represent a much higher percentage. I guess it’s time to rewrite the astronomy books!
 
What kind of characters will you find in the pulsar zoo? All of the characters you’ll view in the pulsar zoo have a few common and bizarre properties. They all have masses upwards of half a million Piles of earth crammed into a sphere about 12 miles in diameter. The second most compact objects astronomers have viewed during the human “Journey to the Beginning of Space and Time”, at the center of a neutron star lies a reality we as humans have yet to comprehend, with densities, at least, ten times the densities scientists have recorded inside the atomic nucleus. The laws of nature in this environment are beyond anything we as humans can truly understand at present, but neutron stars also have other properties.
 

Astronomers continue to study neutron stars in amazement and wonder

 
Neutron stars also rotate at a tremendously fast rate and astronomers have brought neutron stars to the pulsar zoo that rotate 700 times per second. A rate of rotation that despite the pull of gravity on the surface of this neutron star, is likely to create a slightly pancake-shaped body, due to the extreme rate of rotation of this neutron star. The question now is just how fast can a neutron star rotate?
 
What are some of the less common properties of the most bizarre members of the pulsar zoo? We’ll take you through the pulsar zoo on another day and show you some of these weird and unusual celestial bodies. Until then, “Live long and prosper”.
 
Check out my latest astronomy website at http://astronomytonight.yolasite.com/.

 

Read about NASA’s Messenger spacecraft and its mission to Mercury

Have you heard about the recent meteorite that exploded near the Ural Mountains

Read about the supernova astronomers are studying looking for a black hole they think was created during the explosion

HOTECH’s SCA Laser Collimators

High quality laser collimators are hard to find
A time-saving astronomers tool

Astronomy Products

Give you more time for unforgettable Astro-images

Astronomy Products – Laser collimators are indispensable tools for aligning the optics of your time-machine-to-the-stars, but many laser collimators of the past had an inherent weakness in which the collimator wasn’t centered in the focuser. This often caused a small gap to exist between the collimator and the focuser’s drawtube, no matter how precise the machining of the collimator’s barrel. HOTECH’s SCA Laser Collimators have solved this problem using a Self-Centering Adapter (SCA) using rubber compression rings that expand evenly against the drawtube and center the collimator perfectly straight in the focuser.

Innovations in design and function

A clever idea that works by using three perfectly aligned laser beams to simulate the parallel rays coming from a distant star, HOTECH’s SCA Laser Collimators work great for quickly aligning the optics of your time-machine-to-the-stars. Stargazers using Ritchey-Chretien, Dall-Kirkham, Schmidt-Cassegrain, and Maksutov-Cassegrain telescopes can quickly, efficient and reliably prepare their telescope to continue their “Journey to the Beginning of Space and Time”, using the only effective method known to collimate their time-machines-to-the-stars.

HOTECH’s SCA Laser Collimators allow users to perform collimation indoors or outdoors, day or night, using a clear and simple to read display located within a short focal distance of the telescope for diagnosing alignment problems with a telescope optical systems without guess-work. Avoid the frustration of moving between the front and back of your telescope adjusting the corresponding alignment screw, while holding your breath and looking through a high magnification eyepiece trying to reference the concentricity of an image out of focus with HOTECH’s SCA Laser Collimators. You’ll have more time for viewing the universe and taking the unforgettable Astro images you really did all of this work for.

An indispensable tool for the astronomer

Check out my latest astronomy website at http://astronomytonight.yolasite.com/.

Learn how NASA astronomers are planning on detecting extraterrestrial moons orbiting distant suns https://spaceshipearth1.wordpress.com/2013/12/31/searching-for-extraterrestrial-moons/.

Read about the latest news on life beyond Earth https://spaceshipearth1.wordpress.com/2013/12/25/the-search-for-life-beyond-earth-takes-a-turn-at-jupiter/.

Take a look at the latest natural color images taken by the Cassini spacecraft https://spaceshipearth1.wordpress.com/2013/12/22/cassini-spacecraft-show-views-of-the-solar-system-in-natural-color/.

Dance Across the Night Sky with Cassiopeia the Queen

 
 

Stargazers Halloween treats abound in autumn’s night sky

Dance cross the night sky with Cassiopeia the Queen
This star map gives you an idea of the stars in and around Cassiopeia the Queen

Winter treat for the lonely wanderer

Astronomy news (2013-10-15) – Cassiopeia the Queen is one of the first northern deep sky objects we’ll view during our “Journey to the Beginning of Space and Time”. Cassiopeia the Queen is easily recognizable in autumn’s night sky using her characteristic W or M shape form and she was one of the 48 constellations originally listed by the 2nd-century Greek astronomer Ptolemy during his observations of the night sky. Today, Cassiopeia the Queen is one of 88 constellations recognized by modern stargazers in the night sky, and the abundance of magnificent open star clusters within her arms provides viewers with a chance to see a variety of outstanding celestial objects that have been entertaining stargazers for thousands of years.

Five stars outline Cassiopeia’s characteristic W shape

Cassiopeia the Queen is a familiar sight for modern astronomers and stargazers in the mid-northern latitudes of planet Earth and is often one of the first constellations in the northern sky beginning stargazers journey to view. Board your time-machine-to-the-stars near the end of October, or the beginning of November, and take the family on a journey through time and space to visit Cassiopeia the Queen. A visit with Cassiopeia the Queen will open a child’s mind to the possibilities of the universe, before them, and your wife will be able to tell her friends that you took her out last night.

8×50 astronomical binoculars will reveal about 12 stars nestled in among the collective glow of other stars too faint to resolve

Both astronomers and ancient navigators used Cassiopeia as a guide to finding their way

One of the best open star clusters you can view with the naked eye is 6.5 magnitude NGC 129, a large, bright, open cluster of stars 8×50 astronomical binoculars will reveal to have six to twelve brighter stars nestled within the collective glow of a field of stars too faint to resolve using binoculars. You should see about 35 celestial bodies in this region of space and time 5,200 light years distant from your position on the Earth. Look toward the north of two 9th magnitude stars, near the center of NGC 129, and you’ll find the Cepheid variable DL Cassiopeiae. DL Cassiopeiae will fluctuate between 8.6 and 9.3 magnitudes, over the course of an eight-day cycle.

The central star in Cassiopeia’s characteristic W is Gamma Cassiopeiae, a prototype for a class of irregular variable stars believed to be rapidly spinning type-B celestial bodies often fluctuating by as much as magnitude 1.5 or more, Gamma Cassiopeiae will flicker between 2.2 and 3.4 magnitudes as you watch her nightly dance and this star at maximum brightness outshines both Alpha Cassiopeiae and Beta Cassiopeiae. Astronomers believe these apparent fluctuations are due to a decretion disk around this star resulting from the rapid spinning of the star, which results in some of the star’s mass forming a decretion disk. Gamma Cassiopeiae is also a spectroscopic binary star with an orbital period of about 204 days and astronomers believe Gamma Cassiopeiae’s companion star is about the same relative mass as Sol. Part of a small group of stellar sources in the night sky that beam X-ray radiation about 10 times higher than the X-rays emitted from other type-B stars across the cosmos, Gamma Cassiopeiae exhibits both short-term and long-term cycles of x-ray emission. Stargazers should also be able to view Gamma Cassiopeiae as an optical double star, with a faint magnitude 11 companion star, about 2 arcseconds distant from Gamma Cassiopeiae.

Chinese astronomers studied Gamma Cassiopeiae

Ancient stargazers in China called Gamma Cassiopeiae Tsih, which loosely translates as “the whip”, but no references have been found in Arabic or Latin texts of Gamma Cassiopeiae being referred to using a different name. Modern stargazers refer to Gamma Cassiopeiae by a number of different designations, including 27 Cassiopeiae, HR 264, HD 5394, and others. Modern astronauts often use Gamma Cassiopeiae as a star guide because it’s a relatively bright celestial object and in previous space missions this star was used as an easily recognizable navigational reference point in the night sky.

M103 (NGC 581) will reveal about 25 magnitude 10 or fainter stars

Astronomers note two Messier objects

M103 (NGC 581) is the first of two Messier objects in Cassiopeia’s arms viewable through a six-inch time-machine-to-the-stars and should appear as about three dozen stars grouped in a triangular area 6′ across. A fairly compact open cluster, M103 will be 1 degree east of Delta Cassiopeiae, and is the left bottom star of Cassiopeia’s characteristic W shape marking her throne in the night sky. Pierre Mechain was first given credit for seeing this open cluster in the night sky in 1781. Stargazers using 8×50 binoculars will see about 25 magnitude 10 or fainter stars in their view and a string of four stars immediately to M103’s southeast, which adds to the beauty of viewing M103, significantly.

M 52 (NGC7654) is one of the richest open clusters to view north of the celestial equator

The second Messier object in Cassiopeia cataloged by Messier is M52 (NGC 7654), you can locate M52 by drawing a line from Alpha Cassiopeiae through Beta Cassiopeiae, and then extending your line an equal distance to M52. An 8-inch time-machine-to-the-stars will reveal about 75 stars in the night sky clumped in various patterns along the edge of the Milky Way that aren’t lost among the background points of light behind these stars. One of the richest open clusters in Cassiopeia’s arms and north of the celestial equator, Messier made note of M52 in his catalog in 1774. This open cluster will appear as a nebulous mass of about 100 stars in 8×50 astronomical binoculars, with a few individual stars that you can resolve a little better. Stargazers looking for a little extra should look to the north of M52 to find Harrington 12, a wide triangular looking asterism containing about a dozen 5th to 9th magnitude stars, which will appear spectacular in low-power astronomical binoculars.

The Owl spreads its wings

Journey less than 3 degrees south of Delta Cassiopeiae to find the spectacular Owl Cluster (NGC 457), a celestial object ancient stargazers could plainly see in the north night sky, the Owl Cluster’s wings will be clearly viewable using a 4-inch time-machine-to-the-stars. Stargazers can also locate Delta Cassiopeiae by using 5th magnitude Phi Cassiopeiae and 7th magnitude HD 7902, which lie to the southeast of the Owl Cluster. The Own’s eastern wing is a line of four bright stars while the western wing is composed of two pairs of stars arranged in a long rectangle. The brightest star in the Owl Cluster will shine at 8.6 magnitude and will appear a little orange in color to star gazers.

Cassiopeia the Queen reigns in autumn’s night sky

Check out my newest astronomy site at http://astronomytonight.yolasite.com/, and then let me know what you think?

Learn how NASA astronomers are planning on detecting extraterrestrial moons orbiting distant suns https://spaceshipearth1.wordpress.com/2013/12/31/searching-for-extraterrestrial-moons/.

Read about the latest news on life beyond Earth https://spaceshipearth1.wordpress.com/2013/12/25/the-search-for-life-beyond-earth-takes-a-turn-at-jupiter/.

Take a look at the latest natural color images taken by the Cassini spacecraft https://spaceshipearth1.wordpress.com/2013/12/22/cassini-spacecraft-show-views-of-the-solar-system-in-natural-color/.

Garrett Optical Signature 20X110 HD-WP Binoculars

Massively clear optics make using these astronomical binoculars pure fun
Great binoculars for viewing the night sky

Astronomy Products

A time-machine-to-the-stars with two viewing ports gives you a better view

Astronomy Products – Garrett Optical makes some of the top giant stargazing binoculars in the business, including the 20×110 monster binoculars and its higher magnification 28×110 brother, which are part of Garrett Optical’s Signature Line. These two binoculars boast 4.3-inch objectives for wonderfully expansive views of the night sky. The 20×110 puts 2.7 degrees of the night sky into a single field of view, which allows stargazers to view celestial objects like the Pleiades (M45) and the Double Cluster (NGC 869 and NGC 884). The eyepieces of these two giant binoculars aren’t removable, but you can thread standard 1 1/4-inch astronomical filters into the eyepieces of these giant binoculars.

Human beings were made to view the universe using two eyes

 
Check out my latest astronomy site at http://astronomytonight.yolasite.com/.

 

Learn how NASA astronomers are planning on detecting extraterrestrial moons orbiting distant suns https://spaceshipearth1.wordpress.com/2013/12/31/searching-for-extraterrestrial-moons/.

Read about the latest news on life beyond Earth https://spaceshipearth1.wordpress.com/2013/12/25/the-search-for-life-beyond-earth-takes-a-turn-at-jupiter/.

Take a look at the latest natural color images taken by the Cassini spacecraft https://spaceshipearth1.wordpress.com/2013/12/22/cassini-spacecraft-show-views-of-the-solar-system-in-natural-color/.