The Spinning Earth

Astronomers have to compensate for the motion of the Earth in their calculations
The earth rotates on its axis in about 24 hours, give or take a few minutes

The Earth rotates on its axis each day

The Earth goes through a number of different positions which astronomers have measured

We’re always in constant motion

Astronomy questions and answers – The Earth is constantly in motion relative to everything around it and rotates on its axis once every day and orbits Sol once per year. The Earth’s axis is defined as an imaginary line connecting the North and South poles and passing through the center of the planet. The Earth rotates west to east, viewers above the North Pole will see the Earth move counterclockwise from their view, and this is why to star gazers the Sun and stars appear to rise in the east and set in the west every day.

Looking upward at the night sky you don’t actually feel the relative motion of the Earth beneath you, despite this you’re rotating at about 1000 km/hr, depending on where you’re situated on the Earth. Standing in the exact center of the North Pole, your relative speed of rotation is much less than if you were standing on the equator, and the closer you’re to the equator, the faster the Earth beneath you is moving. Standing on the equator the Earth beneath you is rotating at about 1,670 km/hr, move half-way to the North or South Pole, and the speed of rotation of the Earth decreases significantly to about 1,275 km/hr, and once you are standing on the exact North or the South Pole the Earth isn’t rotating. The rotation of the Earth on its axis has consequences for the planet and all life existing on the spaceshipearth1. The daily rotation of the Earth on its axis creates the night and day cycle we all rely on, and this motion combined with the spaceship earth’s orbit around Sol produces the seasonal cycles we all experience during life on Earth. We’ll talk about the Earth’s daily cycle and what this means for life on Earth in future articles.

The spinning Earth makes many things possible

 Check out my newest astronomy site at http://astronomytonight.yolasite.com/.
 
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The Moving Universe

The Earth is moving relative to everything else in the universe

Everything on your “Journey to the Beginning of Space and Time” is moving relative to everything else in the universe

The Earth rotates on its axis

The solar system is moving through the Milky Way

Astronomy questions and answers – Staring upward at the night sky above you get the notion you’re stationary in the universe, but nothing could be further from the truth. The Earth beneath you is spinning on its axis at 1000 km/hr, orbiting Sol at 100,000 km/hr, the Milky Way Galaxy at 800,000 km/hr while the solar system is moving relative to the local stars at 70,000 km/hr. In fact, the universe around us could be moving through a relative space and time of some unknown kind unimaginable to the human consciousness, and we would have no way of detecting this relative motion. We are all travelers in a sense on spaceshipearth1, which is the only habitable planet we know of for humankind that exists in the universe.

The Milky Way is moving through the universe

Everything appears to be moving relative to everything else we view as we look outward into space and time, which makes traveling through space and time a hazardous activity at the best of times. The universe you’ll experience on your “Journey to the Beginning of Space and Time” isn’t the universe you experience on Earth. The relative motions of everything in the universe mean we’ll need to explain a few things to you about the way things work in the universe. In future articles, we’ll talk about the Earth’s rotation and orbit around Sol, and how this affects the planet, we’ll explain the Earth’s motion in the Milky Way Galaxy, and the motion of our solar system in relation to the nearby stars in the night sky. This will give you a base upon which to stand as we take you further out into the cosmos to explain the relative universe you’ll experience during your journey. Toward this goal, we’ll explain the meaning of Einstein’s General and Special Relativity for your trip and the way you’ll experience things during your journey.

Check out my newest astronomy site at http://astronomytonight.yolasite.com/.

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