Young, Newly Formed Dl Cha Star System Gives Astronomers View of Star Formation Processes at Work

Two stars shine brightly through a ring of swirling dust and gas

Two stars shine through the centre of a ring of cascading dust in this image taken by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. The star system is named DI Cha, and while only two stars are apparent, it is actually a quadruple system containing two sets of binary stars. As this is a relatively young star system it is surrounded by dust. The young stars are moulding the dust into a wispy wrap. The host of this alluring interaction between dust and star is the Chamaeleon I dark cloud — one of three such clouds that comprise a large star-forming region known as the Chamaeleon Complex. DI Cha's juvenility is not remarkable within this region. In fact, the entire system is among not only the youngest but also the closest collections of newly formed stars to be found and so provides an ideal target for studies of star formation.
Two stars shine through the centre of a ring of cascading dust in this image taken by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope.

Space news (November 04, 2015) – approximately 160 parsecs from Earth in the Chamaeleon I Dark Cloud –

Astronomers using the Hubble Space Telescope recently viewed one of the youngest and closest star systems found during the human journey to the beginning of space and time. Star system Dl Cha is a young quadruple system of suns deep within the Chamaeleon Complex, a mysterious region of space comprised of three clouds of gas and dust. Composed of two binary star systems, Dl Cha is one of the best young systems to study to learn more about star formation because of its youth and nearness to Sol.

A photogenic group of nebulae can be found toward Chamaeleon, a constellation visible predominantly in skies south of the Earth's equator. Celestial objects visible there include the blue reflection nebulas highlighted by thin dust surrounding the bright stars in the above image center. Toward the top and lower right, dark molecular clouds laced with thick dust block light from stars in the background. The parent molecular cloud Chamaeleon I is located about 450 light years from Earth.
A photogenic group of nebulae can be found toward Chamaeleon, a constellation visible predominantly in skies south of the Earth’s equator.

Dl Cha is located in Chamaeleon I Dark Cloud, one of the closest star-forming regions to Earth, with as many as 200-300 young suns. Newly-formed suns that mold the dust and gas in the surrounding region into a spiraling wrap enveloping Dl Cha in a light-absorbing shroud. A shroud of gas and dust scientists are peering through using the latest ground and space telescopes to learn more about the processes the cosmos uses to create new stars. 

The Chamaeleon I Dark Cloud contains 70-90 mysterious X-ray sources, including Cha Halpha, the first X-ray emitting brown dwarf ever located. As the gas and dust swirls and moves in this region of space, more young stars will be viewed, and the veil surrounding the mystery of these X-ray sources and star formation lifted. A veil lifting astronomers expect to reveal more cosmic mysteries as the human journey to the beginning of space and time unfolds. 

You can learn more about star formation in the cosmos here.

Discover NASA’s mission to the stars here.

Take the journey of the Hubble Space Telescope here.

Learn more about the Chamaeleon Complex and the Chamaeleon I Dark Cloud here.

Read about the Twin Jet Nebula, a truly stunning celestial object with the wings of a butterfly.

Learn about the discoveries made of Pluto and its moons by NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft.

Learn more about main sequence stars like our own Sun.

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Hubble Telescope Views Young Globular Cluster NGC 1783

One of the largest globular clusters in the Large Magellanic Cloud

 This new Hubble image of NGC 1783, taken with the Advanced Camera for Survey (ACS), shows the typical shape of young globular clusters viewed during the human journey to the beginning of space and time. Image credit NASA.

This new Hubble image of NGC 1783, taken with the Advanced Camera for Survey (ACS), shows the typical shape of young globular clusters viewed during the human journey to the beginning of space and time. Image credit NASA.

Space news (September 20, 2015) – 160,000 light-years from Earth toward the constellation Dorado –

Held in the grip of its own gravity, globular cluster NGC 1783 orbits the Milky Way as part of the Large Magellanic Cloud, a region of space filled with star-forming regions like the Tarantula Nebula and LHA 120-N 11.

Lying in the southern hemisphere constellation Dorado, the typical symmetrical form and dense collection of suns near the center of NGC 1783 was first recorded by John Herschel around 1835.

Astrophysicists studied the color and brightness of individual suns within globular cluster NGC 1783 to estimate its age and history of star formation. Measurements indicate that despite its typical distribution of stars and shape this larger star cluster is only about 1.5 billion years old and during its lifespan has undergone at least two-star forming periods separated by 50 to 100 million years. Typically globular clusters viewed are several billion years of age.

The highs and lows of star formation in a globular cluster gives astrophysicists an indication of the density of gas available for new stars to form during its life span. During periods when dense gas is available for star formation, the most massive stars explode as supernovae, blowing away the gas needed for new stars to form. The reservoir of gas for new star formation is then replenished by less massive stars which live longer and die less violently.  Once the reservoir of gas flows to denser, central regions of a star cluster, the second phase of star formation takes place, and a massive star with a short life spans once again blow off the gas. Astrophysicists think this cycle continues until the gas leftover can no longer sustain the formation of new stars.

Learn more about the formation of new stars here.

Discover NASA’s space mission here.

Journey to the beginning of space and time using the Hubble Space Telescope here.

Read more about galactic nurseries found during our journey.

Learn about New Horizons Visit to Pluto and its moon Charon.

Learn more about the star systems discovered during our trip through the cosmos.

V1331 Cyg in Process of Becoming Main Sequence Star

Much like our own Sun

Space news (March 10, 2015) – around 2,000 light-years away in dark cloud LDN 981 –

This NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image shows dust surrounding T Tauri star V1331 Cyg spiraling outward driven by a jet emanating from the young star astronomers think.

Hubble Sees a Young Star Take Center Stage European Space Agency ESA/Hubble, NASA Karl Stapelfeldt (GSFC), B. Stecklum and A. Choudhary (Thüringer Landessternwarte Tautenburg, Germany)
Hubble Sees a Young Star Take Center Stage
European Space Agency
ESA/Hubble, NASA
Karl Stapelfeldt (GSFC), B. Stecklum and A. Choudhary (Thüringer Landessternwarte Tautenburg, Germany)

 

This image is unique because it gives us a view of a main sequence star similar to our own sun in the process of being formed and of one of the poles of the young star. Astronomers think we’re looking down the path of a jet emanating from a pole of the young star that cleared star dust from the path giving us this inspiring view.

Called a reflection nebula, the dusty shape here resembles a snail or beating wing, and is part of the process of the birth of a young star and possible solar system astronomers believe. Astronomers are currently looking at the data and images for features suggesting the formation of a low-mass object in the outer circumstellar disk.

Read about something interesting astronomers discovered about red dwarf stars

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Learn about Einstein’s spacetime

You can learn more about the formation of stars here