NASA Engineers Test Prototype Robotic Asteroid Capture System 

In order to better understand intricate operations and detailed planning needed to capture multi-ton boulder from asteroid surface

A prototype of the Asteroid Redirect Mission (ARM) robotic capture module system is tested with a mock asteroid boulder in its clutches at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. The robotic portion of ARM is targeted for launch in 2021. Located in the center’s Robotic Operations Center, the mockup helps engineers understand the intricate operations required to collect a multi-ton boulder from an asteroid’s surface. The hardware involved here includes three space frame legs with foot pads, two seven degrees of freedom arms that have with microspine gripper “hands” to grasp onto the boulder. NASA and students from West Virginia University built the asteroid mockup from rock, styrofoam, plywood and an aluminum endoskeleton. The mock boulder arrived in four pieces and was assembled inside the ROC to help visualize the engagement between the prototype system and a potential capture target. Inside the ROC, engineers can use industrial robots, a motion-based platform, and customized algorithms to create simulations of space operations for robotic spacecraft. The ROC also allows engineers to simulate robotic satellite servicing operations, fine tuning systems and controllers and optimizing performance factors for future missions when a robotic spacecraft might be deployed to repair or refuel a satellite in orbit. Image Credit: NASA
A prototype of the Asteroid Redirect Mission (ARM) robotic capture module system is tested with a mock asteroid boulder in its clutches at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. The robotic portion of ARM is targeted for launch in 2021.
Located in the center’s Robotic Operations Center, the mockup helps engineers understand the intricate operations required to collect a multi-ton boulder from an asteroid’s surface. The hardware involved here includes three space frame legs with footpads, two seven degrees of freedom arms that have with microspine gripper “hands” to grasp onto the boulder.
NASA and students from West Virginia University built the asteroid mockup from rock, styrofoam, plywood and an aluminum endoskeleton. The mock boulder arrived in four pieces and was assembled inside the ROC to help visualize the engagement between the prototype system and a potential capture target.
Inside the ROC, engineers can use industrial robots, a motion-based platform, and customized algorithms to create simulations of space operations for robotic spacecraft. The ROC also allows engineers to simulate robotic satellite-servicing operations, fine-tuning systems and controllers and optimizing performance factors for future missions when a robotic spacecraft might be deployed to repair or refuel a satellite in orbit.
Image Credit: NASA

Space news (Asteroid Redirect Mission: testing of prototype of robotic capture module system) – The Robotic Operations Center of NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center

NASA's Asteroid Redirect Missions. Credits: NASA/Goddard
A new report provides expert findings from a special action team on how elements of the Asteroid Redirect Mission (ARM) can address decadal science objectives and help close Strategic Knowledge Gaps (SKGs) for future human missions in deep space. Credits: NASA/Goddard

Inside the Robotic Operations Center (ROC) of NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center engineers are at work preparing the robotic section of the Asteroid Redirect Mission (ARM). The most recent work involved testing a prototype of the asteroid capture system with a mock boulder built by NASA and students from West Virginia University. This work will help engineers learn more about the intricate operations needed to capture a multi-ton boulder from the surface of an asteroid. The robotic section of ARM is targeted for a 2021 launch window.

The capability built into the ROC allows engineers to create a simulation of the capture of a boulder from the surface of an asteroid. Here they can also simulate servicing of the satellite, fine tuning of systems and controllers, and even optimize all performance factors for future repairs and refueling. An important capability when building spacecraft worth hundreds of millions of dollars and even more. One that saves money and time.

The Asteroid Redirect Mission is expected to offer benefits that should teach us more about operating in space and enable future space missions. You can read a report here on some of the expected benefits.

The report reflects the findings of a two-month study conducted by members of the Small Bodies Assessment Group (SBAG). It explains many of ARM’s potential contributions to the future of the human journey to the beginning of space and time.

“This report is an important step in identifying ways that ARM will be more scientifically relevant as we continue mission formulation for the robotic and the crew segments,” said Gates. “We’re currently in the process of selecting hosted instruments and payloads for the robotic segment, and hope to receive an updated analysis from the SBAG after we announce those selections in spring 2017.”

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NASA’s OSIRIS-REx Launches Toward 2018 Rendezvous with Asteroid Bennu

Expected 2023 return to Earth with the largest sample returned from space since the era of the Apollo missions

NASA's OSIRIS-REx mission launches from NASA Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. Credits: NASA
NASA’s OSIRIS-REx mission launches from NASA Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. Credits: NASA

Space news (planetary science missions: sampling asteroid that was remnant of early solar system; OSIRIS-REx spacecraft’s seven-year mission to asteroid Bennu) – 7:05 p.m. EDT from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida – 

Post launch conference inside the KSCTV Auditorium after the successful launch of OSIRIS-REx. Credits: Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
Post launch conference inside the KSCTV Auditorium after the successful launch of OSIRIS-REx. Credits: Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

NASA launched its OSIRIS-REx mission to return a sample of a nearby asteroid that formed part of the early solar system more than 4.5 billion years ago at 7:05 on Thursday. The OSIRIS-REx spacecraft will be the agency’s first automated envoy to rendezvous with a nearby asteroid and return a sample for planetary scientists to study and discuss.  

NASA's OSIRIS-REx tests onboard thrusters during its journey to asteroid Bennu in this image. Credits: NASA
NASA’s OSIRIS-REx tests onboard thrusters during its journey to asteroid Bennu in this image. Credits: NASA

“Today, we celebrate a huge milestone for this remarkable mission, and for this mission team,” said NASA Administrator Charles Bolden. “We’re very excited about what this mission can tell us about the origin of our solar system, and we celebrate the bigger picture of science that is helping us make discoveries and accomplish milestones that might have been science fiction yesterday, but are science facts today.” 

How do you study the topography of an asteroid millions of miles away? Map it with a robotic cartographer! The OSIRIS-REx Laser Altimeter, or OLA, is provided by the Canadian Space Agency and will be used to create three-dimensional global topographic maps of Bennu and local maps of candidate sample sites. Credits: NASA
How do you study the topography of an asteroid millions of miles away? Map it with a robotic cartographer! The OSIRIS-REx Laser Altimeter, or OLA, is provided by the Canadian Space Agency and will be used to create three-dimensional global topographic maps of Bennu and local maps of candidate sample sites. Credits: NASA

Scientists suspect asteroids like Bennu could have been the source of much of the water and possibly organic molecules of the Genesis of Earth-based life. An uncontaminated asteroid sample to precisely analysis might provide results far beyond those achieved by spacecraft instruments or studying meteorites that have fallen to Earth.  

Dante Lauretta Professor, Principal Investigator, OSIRIS-REx. Credits: The University of Arizona
Dante Lauretta
Professor, Principal Investigator, OSIRIS-REx. Credits: The University of Arizona

“With today’s successful launch, the OSIRIS-REx spacecraft embarks on a journey of exploration to Bennu,” said Dante Lauretta, OSIRIS-REx principal investigator at the University of Arizona, Tucson. “I couldn’t be more proud of the team that made this mission a reality, and I can’t wait to see what we will discover at Bennu.” 

Doing a gravitational dance with asteroid Bennu

After rendezvousing with asteroid Bennu sometime in 2018, NASA’s OSIRIS-REx spacecraft will begin a delicate gravitational dance with the asteroid, mapping and studying its surface in preparation for collecting a sample. Around July 2020, the spacecraft will perform an intricate, daring maneuver designed to stir up surface material for collection. Plans are to scoop up at least two ounces (60 grams) of small rocks and dust in its onboard sample return container for planetary scientists at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas to examine in depth.  

NASA's OSIRIS-REx mission will map the surface of asteroid Bennu and retrieve a sample of surface material for planetary scientists at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory to examine in depth. Credits: NASA
NASA’s OSIRIS-REx mission will map the surface of asteroid Bennu and retrieve a sample of surface material for planetary scientists at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory to examine in depth. Credits: NASA

“It’s satisfying to see the culmination of years of effort from this outstanding team,” said Mike Donnelly, OSIRIS-REx project manager at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. “We were able to deliver OSIRIS-REx on time and under budget to the launch site, and will soon do something that no other NASA spacecraft has done – bring back a sample from an asteroid.” 

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