Saturn

Stunning Saturn, with its spectacular rings composed of pieces of rock and ice ranging in size from dust grains to city blocks, and mini solar system composed of at least 53 known moons, with another nine needing confirmation 

This montage of images of the Saturnian system was prepared from an assemblage of images taken by the Voyager 1 spacecraft during its Saturn encounter in November 1980. This artist's view shows Dione in the forefront, Saturn rising behind, Tethys and Mimas fading in the distance to the right, Enceladus and Rhea off Saturn's rings to the left, and Titan in lts distant orbit at the top. The Voyager Project is managed for NASA by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California.
This montage of images of the Saturnian system
was prepared from an assemblage of images taken
by the Voyager 1 spacecraft during its Saturn
encounter in November 1980. This artist’s view
shows Dione in the forefront, Saturn rising
behind, Tethys and Mimas fading in the distance
to the right, Enceladus and Rhea off Saturn’s
rings to the left, and Titan in lts distant orbit
at the top. The Voyager Project is managed for
NASA by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena,
California.

Space & Astronomy Wiki – the planets in the solar system – 

Called Saturnus by the Romans and Chronos by the Greeks, Saturn was first recorded by the Assyrians in the 8th century BC, and first seen through a telescope by Galileo in 1610.

The second biggest planet in the solar system at a radius of 58,232 km, Saturn is the sixth planet from the sun, and orbits at a distance of 1.4 billion km (886 million miles) or 9.5 AU from Sol. 

It takes 29 Earth-years for Saturn to orbit the sun once, which is the length of a year on the most distant planet viewed by ancient astronomers. Spinning on it’s axis once every 10.5 hours, the length of the day and night cycle on this distant world, the seasons on Saturn are long and hard.

The least dense of all the planets, with a specific density 0.7 less than water, you wouldn’t be able to stand on the surface of Saturn. A boat composed of water would do the trick, since water would float on the surface of this planet composed primarily of helium and hydrogen.

Reaching the surface of Saturn would be an amazing and dangerous journey, considering the average wind speed in the atmosphere is 500 meters per second (1650 feet per second) near the equator.

The first human envoy to reach Saturn was Pioneer 11 in 1979, when it flew to within 13,700 miles (22,000 km), and discovered the planet’s strong magnetic field and two previously unseen outer rings.

For more information on Saturn go here.

Read about the southern polar region on Enceladus erupting icy grains of water and organic material into Saturn’s E ring.

Learn about the way the stars seed the universe with the building blocks within us all.

Learn how thousands of years ago Peruvian astronomers used 13 towers spread along the horizon to mark the rising and setting of the sun through the year.

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