Begin Planning Your Journey to Comet 103P/Hartley

Board your time machine to the stars near the end of October

Astronomy is a passion, a desire to find the truth
Comet 103P/Hartley leaves a trail as it travels through the inner solar system

Comet 103P/Hartley is an astronomy treat during September

Astronomy News – September is the time for you and the kids to begin planning a journey to a celestial body that will be at its closest point to Earth and Sol, sometime near the end of October. Comet 103P/Hartley has been in the news, of late, as NASA’s Deep Impact spacecraft will fly by Comet 103P/Hartley, in the first part of November. Observers boarding their time-machine-to-the-stars at this time should get a nice view of Comet 103P/Hartley and it might even be possible to view this celestial object with the naked eye, depending on the environmental conditions at the time of viewing. A good pair of viewing binoculars should give viewers a great view of Comet 103P/Hartley, but your time machine to the stars is the best way to journey to Comet 103P/Hartley, to have a look at a celestial object that only becomes viewable during specific periods of time. Comet 103P/Hartley is returning to Earth for the fourth time since Australian astronomer Malcolm Hartley discovered her in 1986. A short-period comet that loops through the inner solar system, Comet 103P/Hartley’s space journey takes about 6.5 years to complete one orbit. You should arrive at Comet 103P/Hartley just before the arrival of NASA’s Deep Impact spacecraft.

Deep Impact Spacecraft making astronomy history

During the visit by NASA’s Deep Impact spacecraft, space scientists will use the information and data provided by onboard cameras and instruments to help them pierce the shroud surrounding the comet and hopefully determine the source of dusty jets viewed on Comet 103P/Hartley. Dusty jets that have been dancing in the dreams of space scientists, since they first viewed them through Earth-bound telescopes, which show the effect as a pinprick of light at the center of the comet’s glow. Astronomers and space scientists refer to this effect as a comet’s “false nucleus”, which hides the comets real surface from view.

Comet 103P/Hartley is becoming more visible to stargazers as it approaches the Earth and Sun. This celestial object could reach magnitude 10 near the end of September, which will make viewing easier for star gazers, and allow space scientists to study this comet closer. The best time for stargazers to view Comet 103P/Hartley will be under a dark sky starting around September 24. Comet 103P/Hartley will be in the arms of Cassiopeia at this time, south of Cassiopeia’s w-shaped asterism, and will be viewable throughout the night.

Take a journey to Cassiopeia tonight

Read about NASA’s Messenger spacecraft and its mission to Mercury

Have you heard about the recent meteorite that exploded near the Ural Mountains

Read about the supernova astronomers are studying looking for a black hole they think was created during the explosion

Green Cheese? Anyone!

 The Moon waxes on and waxes off in September

The Moon has astronomy treats to delight the heart
The Moon’s Mare is a land feature you don’t want to miss during September

Viewing the limb of the Moon

Astronomy News – Focus your time machine to the stars on the features along the Moon’s limb during the month of September. This is a rare chance to view a few limb sections of the Moon that star gazers have dreamed of taking a closer look at for generations, during a single month of the year. Astronauts didn’t report any green cheese, so our ancestors can rest safely as we have ruled out green cheese as the main ingredient in the physical composition of the Moon.

Watch as the crescent Moon waxes, between September 11 to 13, and take a close look at Mare Crisium, and how far this feature is from the eastern edge. The features on the limb that you’ll notice will be the elongated dark patches of Mare Smythii and Mare Marginis. The regions near the south-eastern limb will feature primarily bright highlands that will slowly change as the 18 of September approaches and the mottled Mare Australe rotates into view.

Focus your astronomy telescope on the Moon

Focus your time machine to the stars in the hilly south polar region a few nights later and you’ll see nice 3D effects that catch-the-eye of the viewer and Mare Smythii and Mare Marginis will have disappeared from view.

A Full Moon will greet star gazers on September 23 and this is the perfect time to take a look at some of the best features on the Moon’s surface. Mare Orientale will appear along the Moon’s western limb on September 23. A magnificent impact basin, with multiple visible rings and lava lakes, get your timing right over the next few nights, and you’ll witness a scene few humans have experienced. Watch patiently and you’ll see the rings appear in profile first. This scene will slowly change as the Moon’s libration and the rotation of the Earth bring the lava pools of Lacus Veris and Lacus Autumni into view.

There will be a Full Moon on September 23

Read about NASA’s Messenger spacecraft and its mission to Mercury

Have you heard about the recent meteorite that exploded near the Ural Mountains

Read about the supernova astronomers are studying looking for a black hole they think was created during the explosion

Black Holes in Unusual Places

Black holes and humans have more in common than we first thought, we can both be a little off-center

Black holes are being found in unusual places
Large black holes like this one are found at the center of galaxy M31

Black holes are one of astronomy’s greatest mysteries

Astronomy News – Astronomers have discovered a rather unusual black hole –

Black holes are unusual celestial objects typically found at the center of galaxies, according to space scientists and astronomers, but space scientists at the University of Utrecht in the Netherlands think they have found a black hole a little off-center. Astronomers typically find black holes by looking for strong x-ray sources near the places they think black holes should exist. Friction heats matter falling into a strong gravity source, such as a black hole, creating copious amounts of x-rays, which space scientists use to locate possible black holes. Astronomers at the University of Utrecht in the Netherlands believe they have found a black hole in a less typical location in one nondescript galaxy.

Black holes are unusual celestial objects typically found at the center of galaxies, according to space scientists and astronomers, but space scientists at the University of Utrecht in the Netherlands think they have found a black hole a little off-center. Astronomers typically find black holes by looking for strong x-ray sources near the places they think black holes should exist. Friction heats matter falling into a strong gravity source, such as a black hole, creating copious amounts of x-rays, which space scientists use to locate possible black holes. Astronomers at the University of Utrecht in the Netherlands believe they have found a black hole in a less typical location in one nondescript galaxy.

The black hole in question appears to be located about 10,000 light-years from the center of the galaxy in question. What’s this 1-billion-solar-mass black hole doing so far from the center of the galaxy? Space scientists postulate, using the available facts, that large black holes, like the one in question, could be created during the collision of two smaller black holes. This would eject the bigger black hole out of the galaxy’s center at high-speed, space scientists believe, and could be one-way black holes could be relocated to another galactic address.

This black hole is slightly off-centre

Read about NASA’s Messenger spacecraft and its mission to Mercury

Have you heard about the recent meteorite that exploded near the Ural Mountains

Read about the supernova astronomers are studying looking for a black hole they think was created during the explosion

The Windswept Northern Polar Cap of Mars

Astronomy News

The wind swept north polar cap of Mars is a great place for astronomy lovers to visit
Mars north polar cap has a few interesting features for star gazers to see.

Mar is showing astronomers things they suspected

Astronomy News – The human journey to Mars –

Scientists using the Shallow Radar (SHARAD) instrument on NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter to look beneath Mar’s north polar ice cap and get an idea of the lay of the ground think they know how Chasma Boreale and the much-discussed series of spiral troughs were formed. The formation of Chasma Boreale and enigmatic spiral troughs have been talked about for four decades by space scientists and amateur astronomers. Mar’s north polar region is really just a stack of ice and dust layers up to 2 miles thick and encompassing an area equivalent to Texas. Chasma Boreale is a distinctive land feature as long as the Grand Canyon, only wider and deeper, while the troughs spiral outward from their centers like huge pinwheels.

Astronomy lovers should take a look at these spiral troughs
These spiral troughs have enticed the imagination of viewers for forty years.

What did astronomers and planet scientists using SHARAD to look beneath Mar’s north polar cap reveal concerning the formation of Chasma Boreale and associated spiral troughs? The view beneath Mar’s north polar cap suggests strong winds were the main force of geological change involved in the formation of the Chasma Boreale and spiral troughs over millions of years. The geological processes involved would have formed Chasma Boreale and spiral troughs as Mar’s north polar ice cap was formed.

Professional astronomers are studying these troughs 

Read about NASA’s Messenger spacecraft and its mission to Mercury

Have you heard about the recent meteorite that exploded near the Ural Mountains

Read about the supernova astronomers are studying looking for a black hole they think was created during the explosion

Take a Young Mind on Your Journey to the Beginning of Space and Time

Secure the Future of Astronomy by Opening Young Minds to the Possibilities in the Night Sky

Astronomy News – Show your children the possibilities of the cosmos before them –

Take a young mind on your “Journey to the Beginning of Space and Time”, and you’ll be helping to secure the future of astronomy and possibly humankind. The young minds of the world are the future and will be making the important choices in the century of the environment. The experiences they undertake at this critical age will lay the foundation for everything they believe throughout their lives. Once they lay their head upon the cold earth and their mind embraces the immensity of the night sky above them. They’ll realize just how small and diminutive the Earth and life-on-earth really is, and the importance of protecting the planet, for all life.

Make it a family affair and take the wife and kids out into the wilderness. Set up your time machine to the stars and take the family on a “Journey to the Beginning of Space and Time”. On a clear night, the night sky will open the young mind to the universe and the immensity of space and time. Point out larger, more visible celestial objects first, and then you can slowly introduce the harder to view celestial bodies as their mind begins to digest the information and grasp the concepts involved and their consciousness expands in response to the possibilities before their eyes.

Young astronomers are best suited for the journey

By opening a young mind to the universe in the night sky, you’re opening their consciousness to the possibilities before their eyes and helping them put everything in the universe in realistic proportion in their young minds, and you could be giving them a useful tool for survival in the battle for survival on planet Earth. At the same time, you’re helping to breathe life into astronomy, and contributing to the general understanding of the true role humans play and could play incoming cosmic events in the century of the environment.

Start with the basic celestial objects in the solar system, and save the longer space trips and abstract objects and concepts until a later time in your “Journey to the Beginning of Space and Time“. Before you know it your young ones will be asking to journey to some far off part of the universe they have only heard mentioned in whispers, and their journey will really begin.

By taking a “Journey to the Beginning of Space and Time” you could inadvertently be creating the desire to venture out into the universe to witness the awesomeness of the night sky in person and the birth of a space explorer that will alter the course of human history. Helping to protect the Earth, all living things, and shape the future of humankind, in your own little way.

Astronomy is still young and we need young minds for the next leg of the human journey to the beginning of space and time

Read about NASA’s Messenger spacecraft and its mission to Mercury

Have you heard about the recent meteorite that exploded near the Ural Mountains

Read about the supernova astronomers are studying looking for a black hole they think was created during the explosion

Blaze Your Name in the Night Sky

Celestial bodies in the night sky are often named after their discoverers

Astronomy News – Write your name in the annals of the human journey to the beginning of space and time –

Take a look at the night sky above you and name a few of the celestial objects you know in your head. Would you like to leave your name written in the annals of astronomy and human history? One of the greatest honors for an astronomer is to have their name adorn a celestial body in the night sky. Look up into the night sky and many of the stellar bodies you see will have been named in honor of their discoverer, a famous figure in history or science, or will have been given a designation of some type to distinguish them from other stellar bodies. Humans will forever speak of the distant ice balls at the fringe of the solar system we refer to as the Kuiper Belt and Haley’s Comet.

Halley's Comet will be back one day
Halley’s Comet will be seen again in a few years

Astronomy lovers can write their name in the history books

True, the chances of a celestial body in the night sky being named for a particular amateur astronomer is remote, at best, considering the competition and the fact that the decision is made by other powers in the universe. The possibility of this certainly increases for a professional astronomer making a significant discovery, but the final decision is still in the hands of other powers. There are a lot more amateur astronomers looking at the night sky on a nightly basis than professional astronomers, and this fact alone is going to make it likely that amateur astronomers will make significant contributions to the history of astronomy.

It certainly wouldn’t be surprising if a professional astronomer or two have spent a few moments in contemplation of a celestial body being named in their honour or moment in time when they could be making astronomy history. Speculating astronomers might have even gone to the trouble of choosing a name for their discovery. The actual naming of newly discovered celestial bodies is actually conducted by other powers in the world of astronomy.

This doesn’t mean that amateur astronomers aren’t honoured by having their names adorn a celestial body in the night sky. Tom Bopp, an amateur stargazer will forever live on in the minds of humans as the discoverer of the biggest comet of the twentieth century, Hale-Bopp, which was also independently discovered by astronomer Alan Hale.

Hale-Bopp is often very bright in the night sky when it appears
Hale-Bopp’s two tails are in view here

Astronomy is a journey all human beings can take part in

The only way you can hope to leave your name written in the history of astronomy is to spend time watching the night sky above you. Every time you board your time machine to the stars and soar upward and out into the cosmos, you could find something that no human has seen before.

Join me every night as we’ll “Journey to the Beginning of Time and Space” and go on a voyage of discovery that will take us to unknown parts of the universe.

We board our astronomy telescope nightly

Read about the present news on the search for life beyond Earth https://spaceshipearth1.wordpress.com/2013/12/25/the-search-for-life-beyond-earth-takes-a-turn-at-jupiter/.

View the latest in high definition images of the solar system provided by NASA’s Cassini spacecraft https://spaceshipearth1.wordpress.com/2013/12/22/cassini-spacecraft-show-views-of-the-solar-system-in-natural-color/.

We tell you about the astronomy highlights upcoming for 2014 https://spaceshipearth1.wordpress.com/2013/12/19/2014-the-journey-ahead/.

Take a Nightly Celestial Ride during September

Astronomy during September is amazing

Astronomy News – Huddle around a campfire and journey to the stars –

The nights of September 2010 will feature essentially the same night sky as the one your ancestors used as a basis for many of the myths and stories that have been passed down to the modern world of today. September’s star gazers can sit huddled around the fire each night of the month, just as their ancestors did thousands of years in the past. The perfect time to board your time machine to the stars and take a journey through space and time or lay your back upon the cold earth and let the night’s sky open your mind to the possibilities of the universe.

The nights of September 2010 will feature essentially the same night sky as the one your ancestors used as a basis for many of the myths and stories that have been passed down to the modern world of today. September’s star gazers can sit huddled around the fire each night of the month, just as their ancestors did thousands of years in the past. The perfect time to board your time machine to the stars and take a journey through space and time or lay your back upon the cold earth and let the night’s sky open your mind to the possibilities of the universe.

Astronomy during September is unforgettable

The Moon is one of the first places the human journey to the beginning of space and time visited

The Last Quarter Moon will step onto September’s celestial stage on September 1, at 1:22 P.M Eastern Daylight Time (EDT) and start September’s celestial dance. Heavenly Venus will join the dance at 2 P.M. EDT on September 1, as she passes to within about 1.2 degrees south of Spica and will form a line with Mars on one side and Spica spinning in the middle.

Mercury will be in inferior conjunction at 9 A.M. EDT on September 3. Mars will dance to within 2 degrees north of Spica at 10 A.M. EDT on September 4, but this dancing pair will slowly fade from view over the next few days, as the Moon moves closer to the Earth.

Mercury is the hardest of the planets to view, but if you look late in September, you have the best chance of seeing Mercury.

Moon astronomy takes patience

The Moon will light up the night sky at 11:58 P.M. EDT on September 7. Earth’s satellite moves to within 221,948 miles of spaceshipearth1 on this date and the show on this night can light up the night sky. A New Moon will greet star gazers at 6:30 A.M. EDT on September 8 and on September 9 the moon will pass to within 8 degrees south of Saturn at 6 P.M. The celestial dance between Saturn and the Moon can light up your imagination as the Moon makes a pass by Saturn.

Saturn is part of astronomy royalty
On September 1, Saturn will set an hour after the Sun and will stand about 5 degrees high in the west sky 30 minutes after sunset

Asteroid Flora will take astronomy lovers for a ride

Asteroid Flora will be in opposition on the tenth of September at 11 P.M. EDT. Asteroid Flora is a difficult celestial body to view for beginning stargazers. Should you desire to take a look at asteroid Flora at her finest on this night, it might be wise to obtain the help or advice of veteran stargazers in your search.

The Moon will also be dancing in the night’s sky on September 10. The Moon will pass to within 5 degrees south of Mars at 4 A.M. EDT and will then dance across the night sky and pass within 0.3 degrees south of Venus at 9 A.M. EDT.

Asteroid Laetitia will be in opposition on September 14 at 6 A.M. EDT. This is your chance to view a celestial body that has been entertaining star gazers and filling them with awe and wonder for thousands of generations.

The third week of September begins with a First Quarter Moon 1:50 A.M. EDT on September 15. Four days later, on September 19, Mercury will be at its greatest western elongation of 18 degrees at 1 P.M. EDT. The Moon will pass within 5 degrees north of Neptune at noon EDT on September 20, viewers should see both Neptune and the Moon in the night sky, but this will depend on environmental conditions at the time of viewing.

Asteroid 8 Hebe is at opposition at 2 A.M. EDT on September 21. The thirteenth biggest asteroid by mass in the known solar system and the fifth brightest celestial body in the asteroid belt, asteroid 6 Hebe is believed to be the source of H chondrite meteorites and IIE iron meteorites, which account for about 40 percent of the meteorites that land on Earth.

The Moon is at apogee (252, 379 miles from Earth) at 4:02 A.M. EDT on September 21. Apogee is the point at which the Moon is at its farthest distance from the Earth in its orbit.

Mighty Jupiter rules the night on September 21, the largest planet in our solar system will be in opposition at 8 A.M. EDT on this day and Neptune will follow into opposition at 1 P.M. EDT. Jupiter shines at magnitude 2.9 on this night and will look bigger visually than at any time since October 1963, at about 49.9 ” across.

Jupiter is the king of the planets
Jupiter will be as visible as it has since 1963 during opposition on September 21.

Astronomy royalty takes center stage

Jupiter will still be one of the brightest celestial objects in the night sky on September 22 and viewers should be able to get a great view of mighty Jupiter in all its glory using their time machine to the stars throughout the month. Jupiter will pass within 0.9 degrees south of Uranus on September 22, at 3 P.M. EDT, and this is a great time to take a look at two of the biggest celestial bodies in the solar system. Watch for a few hours, before Jupiter passes to within 0.9 degrees south of Uranus, and you can see the Earth enter autumnal equinox at 11:09 P.M. EDT.

A Full Moon will occur at 5:17 A.M. EDT on September 23. The Moon will travel toward Neptune and Jupiter during the next hour and forty-five minutes and will pass within 7 degrees north of Jupiter and 6 degrees North of Uranus at 7 A.M. EDT. Viewers that watch throughout the day will get to see Venus at her brightest at 4 P.M. EDT, at this time, Venus will shine at magnitude 4.8, the perfect time to view demure Venus in September’s night sky.

Venus, for lovers, and unforgettable astronomy

Venus is once again the main attraction on the night of September 29. Venus will pass within 6 degrees south of Mars at 2 A.M. EDT on this night and will shine bright enough for good viewing using your time machine to the stars or good viewing binoculars.

September 30 will see Saturn enter into conjunction with Sol, at 9 P.M. EDT. This is a great opportunity to view the ringed planet and view a celestial body that has fascinated the human imagination for generations. Keep watching until 11:52 P.M. EDT and you’ll see the Last Quarter Moon appear in the night sky at 11:52 P.M. EDT.

Astronomy continues next month

Read about the present news on the search for life beyond Earth https://spaceshipearth1.wordpress.com/2013/12/25/the-search-for-life-beyond-earth-takes-a-turn-at-jupiter/.

View the latest in high definition images of the solar system provided by NASA’s Cassini spacecraft https://spaceshipearth1.wordpress.com/2013/12/22/cassini-spacecraft-show-views-of-the-solar-system-in-natural-color/.

We tell you about the astronomy highlights upcoming for 2014 https://spaceshipearth1.wordpress.com/2013/12/19/2014-the-journey-ahead/.